When Should You Replace Exterior Railings?

Deck, porch and other exterior railings are an important feature of your home. They serve a sort of double duty, particularly those in the front of the house, as they make these areas safer and more secure, but they are also a prominent part of the “first impression” people will have of your home. A worn or broken railing poses a safety risk, and it looks unsightly. You’ll probably find that eventually, you will need to replace them. Your team here at Cacciola Iron Works is here with some tips to help you know when it would be best to make a replacement.

Worn Connections

If you’re seeing damage or corrosion around the screws, nails, and joints that join parts of your railing, that’s a sure sign that it isn’t going to last much longer. And it’s not always in the form of rust; sometimes it manifests as powdery white debris, so be on the lookout for both.

Wobbling

This usually speaks for itself. The important thing to be aware of is knowing how your railings should feel compared to how they do feel. Most railings naturally have a bit of give simply by virtue of being narrow constructions. But if they are actually moving in their fastenings, that’s a problem. Sometimes this can be fixed by simply tightening or replacing those fastenings, but in other cases, it may require replacing the railing.

Warping

An issue that manifests almost exclusively with wood railings, warping can dramatically reduce the lifespan of your railing. This tends to happen because of moisture that has made its way into the wood and expanded it, or caused rot, due to poor sealing. If you’re lucky, just a single warped part may be able to be replaced, but often warping requires more extensive replacement.

If you find that your railings have issues like these, or have been looking into getting replacements already, Cacciola Iron Works has just what you need. Visit us online, or contact us today to learn more about our beautiful products and thorough services.

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